Reading log week 6

For our reading log on week 6 is about the Jesuits attempts to assimilate the aboriginal peoples. This reading log interested me because in my anthropology class we also learned about the past and ongoing assimilation attempt of the aboriginal culture. This still relates to modern times because aboriginal assimilation and racism is still represented in todays media. Although today’s society is always changing and growing more accepting of people, this racism is still prominent. This shows that even though an event such as colonization can happen so far in the past, can still effect today’s society.

Here is my second reading log:

Kelsey Stewart (T00546717)

September 19, 2016

Tracy Penny Light

History 1120

Reading Log #2:

               

                The main issue in this article is an argument about religion between the Jesuits (Christianity) and the aboriginal peoples and their cultural values. This article was written to show the Jesuits attempt in assimilating the Aboriginal Peoples to Christian culture, but as seen in the article, the Huron people had no interest in Christian beliefs. One example of this is where the Jesuits insisted that if the Huron people did not convert to Christianity they would go to hell. When the Jesuits made this claim, the Huron people believed that hell was just used as an intimidation to force the acceptance of Christianity. This sheds light on our understanding of the past because it shows Huron and Jesuit thoughts about each other’s culture and why their religious beliefs are so diverse. This argument is convincing because it has many direct quotes from both Huron and Jesuit people, and does not only show one religions views on the topic.

                The author used many quotes from both the Huron and the Jesuit people as well as several bible quotes, and because of this incorporated evidence, the article has a convincing argument. One primary source the author used was a quote from a Huron person, “I am content to be damned.”, when talking about his disbelief in hell (71). This article is linked to the vast topic of Aboriginal assimilation, and further widens our views on both sides of the issue.

                As I read the article I was curious about how many Huron people converted to Christianity during this time and what their reasoning behind converting was. I am curious about this because the quotes from the Huron people seemed extremely against Christianity and their beliefs. I would like to further discuss the number of Huron people that converted to Christianity, and how the Huron people treated the ones who converted.

Reflecting on the Lesson (Week 3)

During week 3 we discussed Samuel de Champlain’s order of good cheer. We talked about how it was used to boost moral of the colonists during the long and cold winter. This feast is planned by all the men to keep them busy and excited for the future. This relates to the feast that we had on the last day of seminar. That feast boosted my moral as it was finals season and I was very stressed out just as it was supposed to do for the colonists. This feast made finals season not seem so bad for a little while, as I was looking forward to the feast. This allowed me to connect to the colonists to compare their struggles to the struggles we face today.

Here is the link for the slides:

http://moodle.tru.ca/pluginfile.php/401720/mod_resource/content/1/Week%206%20HIST1120%28F16%29.pdf

How to Think Historically

In this course we were taught how to think historically to “do history”. Because I have taken previous history courses, this is not a new understanding for me. Thinking historically involves interpreting historical documents and analyzing the past. While reading these documents, a historian should consider when it was written, where it was written and who it was written by to analyze if there is a bias involved. If a bias is involved, it could shift the credibility of the document and altering the truth. We practised this while writing our document analysis, research paper and with our reading logs. Another important aspect of thinking historically is to consider many documents discussing the same topic written by many different people. It is important to analyze all sides to the story because of bias once again and people have different perspectives of an event. We practiced this while writing our research paper because we had to sort through all the documents to examine many different perspectives on our topic. These aspects come together to from historical thinking.

 

My Last reading log expresses how to think historically and “do history”.

Last Reading log:

As I am in many history courses, and have taken them in the past “doing history” is not a new concept for me. Doing history consists of analysing historic documents to uncover the story of the past. While analysing documents, a historian should consider bias in the document by looking at when it was written, where it was written, and by who it was written. This is all important information to consider as a historian because it could shift the credibility of the document, and therefore shift the history it represents. We practised this historical method of analysing when we wrote our document analysis. It is also important to look at several documents on the same topic, and from all sides of the story, this is significant because of bias once again, and because people have different views of historical situation. We practiced this historical method while writing our research papers, because we had to sort through many documents expressing many different perspectives on our topic. All of these methods combine together to produce historical thinking.

Reflecting on the Post (Week 3)

On week three, we discussed the northwest coast and the great plain areas. We also discussed the reasons why the area was important to the aboriginals and important aspects of the land. An example of this is one the plains there is a high importance of buffalo, as the aboriginal hunt these buffalo to survive off of. I enjoyed this lesson because I had some previous knowledge on the subject, and therefore it was easy to connect and have a better understanding of the lesson. We discussed this in my anthropology class while discover the relationship between the land and the people.

Here is the link to the slides:

http://moodle.tru.ca/pluginfile.php/398338/mod_resource/content/1/Week%203%20slidesHIST1120%28F16%29.pdf

Reflecting on the lesson (Week 10)

The lesson we had on week 10 particularly interested me because it was about the rebellion and reform in Upper Canada. I find this interesting because I like to learn about people fighting for what they believe and push for a change for the better of society. Even though the rebellion failed, the public still tried to take charge of their lives. This lesson forced us to think as a civilian during this time, and to interpret what made them rebel against the government. We also considered the governments reasons for treating the people how they did, and why some of the laws were made. This gave us a better understanding of both sides of the rebellion.

 

http://moodle.tru.ca/course/view.php?id=4966

Chilcotin War Assignment

Thinking Historically  with the Chilcotin War

For this assignment we had to think historically to try to uncover the truth about the Chilcotin War. In groups we analyzed the website that held many different documents. My group decided to focus on the court documents because they gave a quick over view of the event.
It had court witness statements that discussed their sides of the story, which is an important consideration when thinking historically. These documents forced us to become detectives and place together the evidence to form the truth behind the historical story. This was teaching us how to infer and analyze from statements and documents to interpret the event.

This assignment relates to my anthropology class because they both look historically into aboriginal groups. Acknowledging the social norms of these aboriginal groups and acknowledging their beliefs as legitimate form of knowledge is practicing aboriginal studies. I also had to analyze documents in both of these classes, but in anthropology I analyzed how aboriginals are perceived in the media to express on going colonialism. In our class we learned about colonization of the Europeans, while in anthropology we learn how post-colonialism is still an ongoing process.

 

My Group’s Paper:

 

“We do not know his name”

Solving the mystery of the Chilcotin War

        The war of the Chilcotin people arose due to anger. The First nation people wanted to rebel because Europeans were bringing in small pox while the process of colonizing their land was taking place. Even though the Europeans had innocent intentions the Chilcotin took this act personally resulting in the death of nineteen innocent railroad workers also including a farmer. 

          Court documents were easily understood as they were interpreted in first person and these witnesses were under oath. The interpretations are straight forward and provide us with enough evidence to conclude our solving of this mystery. The war came as a shock to the group mainly because the Europeans treated First Nations wrongfully throughout all of history. However, in this case the Chilcotin people rebelled and killed off innocent people, which puts them in them in wrong and does not make their actions acceptable.

           When examining the court documents, we used the witness statements to determine those who were guilty and those who were innocent out of the six Chilcotin men. We established that Klattassin assembled the idea to slaughter the railroad workers who intruded on their land. After examining the documents, we confirmed that Lutas, Teechit, Klattassin, Ahan, Tineatineu, and Ahans father were prosecuted as the six Chilcotin murderers. We believe that Lutas was innocent, given the evidence provided from his own testimony. He claimed he did fire his weapon, but only shot a horse even though he did agree to attempt to murder the railroad workers.

 

Work Cited:

 

http://www.canadianmysteries.ca/sites/klatsassin/archives/courtdocument/indexen.html

 

My Peak into 1912

This summer I had a job at a historical society cite, that was also a tourist center called the Baillie House. This property was built in 1912 by a Mr. Bigney who built the property for his mail order bride coming from over seas. Unfortunately, she fell in love with another man on the ship and never came to Forksdale, which is now known as Merritt. Mr.Bigney opened a pop bottle business and sold beverages to local coal miners. After he died, the Baillie family moved in and that is why it is called the Baillie House. For my job, I had to give people a snapshot of what a typical house would look like in 1912-1940. This involved me learning about old tools-items and what they were used for.

I know this is a little after the time frame we had in our class, but it is still an experience with Canadian history. I still had to think historically when learning about all the different items, and to understand why and how they did certain things. I had to think like I was in 1912 to understand their perspectives, just like I do when reading documents for my reading logs. For example, I was shocked to hear about how the mail order bride never came, but this was a common situation as the boat rides would often take months. After I discovered this was a normal occurrence at this time, I was no longer surprised she did not show.

This connects to our class because we learned about the Filles De Roi. Although this woman was coming over on a boat much later, and already had a fiancé waiting, women are still crossing seas in hopes of a different life and looking for a husband. Both of these women would have had major culture shock as they are in a completely different country, with new societal norms. They would have both had to give up their past life, and change into a new one with a stranger, in a different country.

Personal Review on Reading logs

The reading logs were a learning valuable and challenging experience for me. As I began writing my reading logs I struggled with writing format, writing style and comprehension of the documents. It was a strenuous process as I struggled to understand the documents, and then detecting their argument. As I forced myself to continue this process, it soon became easier and a more efficient process. I was soon able to analyse the document to uncover bias, purpose of document and the overall argument being made in the document. It also made me learn how to take large documents and condense them into summarized arguments.

These new learned skills allowed me to advance as a better writer in my other classes such as anthropology and sociology. I could now easily analyse other forms of history such as newspapers, magazines and news broadcasting.

My Last Reading Log

This reading log was the easiest to write for me because throughout the reading logs, I was learning how to do history. Writing and composing my logs, forced me to think like a historian and analyse documents instead of just reading them. Although, this was not the only time I have had to analyse documents as in one of my former history classes I had to write a Primary document analysis, just like the one in this class.

This reading log really made me understand how writing these reading logs would help me with my writing skills in other classes. It forced me to look deeper into the argument of the document, and be aware of bias within the piece. This is a very important skill for my history, anthropology and my sociology classes. For anthropology and sociology classes, I have to analyse media and how it interpret and effects certain races and societies. From learning to analyse historical documents, it allows me to easily grasp a understanding on how to analyse media.

 

 

 

Kelsey Stewart

November 29th, 2016

Final Reading log:

            As I am in many history courses, and have taken them in the past “doing history” is not a new concept for me. Doing history consists of analysing historic documents to uncover the story of the past. While analysing documents, a historian should consider bias in the document by looking at when it was written, where it was written, and by who it was written. This is all important information to consider as a historian because it could shift the credibility of the document, and therefore shift the history it represents. We practised this historical method of analysing when we wrote our document analysis. It is also important to look at several documents on the same topic, and from all sides of the story, this is significant because of bias once again, and because people have different views of historical situation. We practiced this historical method while writing our research papers, because we had to sort through many documents expressing many different perspectives on our topic. All of these methods combine together to produce historical thinking.

Reading Log Week Six

This reading log was not one of my better ones, as it was during my midterms. But although it was not very good, I can still look back and learn from it. I can look back and see what a rushed reading log looks like to remind me to give myself enough time to write them.

As my reading log expresses, I am terrible at reading documents that have different language than I am used to. That is why I struggled with this log.

 

Kelsey Stewart

History 1120

Reading Log #6

 

This week’s readings were on the charivari in France. As the document, “From Folklore to Revolution: Charivari and the Lower Canadian Revolution of 1837” states that the charivari was mostly used for political reasons.[1] This was used to produce a new regime in vengeance against the current government of the time. This document used many examples of how Charivari was used, in many different places and for different reasons. This document supports its arguments by citing various sources they retrieved their information from. As this document was longer, I found it difficult to follow, although it was still very resourceful.

As I was attempting to read this reading log, I had a hard time understanding the pages of the book we were assigned to read, as it was written with language hard to understand. And that is why I mainly focused on the document, rather than the book.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reid, Sara. “Susanna Moodie: Roughing it in the Bush.” School Library Journal 62, no. 9 (September 2016): 166.  Academic Search Complete, EBSCOhost (accessed November 2, 2016)